Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2012

J. Harley Bonds Career Center Earns National Recognition

Students working on dissecting tissuesJ. Harley Bonds Career Center is one of only four technology centers in the nation to receive the national 2012 Technology Centers That Work (TCTW) Gold Improvement Award based on the progress of local center leaders and teachers in improving center practices and raising student performance.

The award was presented by Dave Spence, president of the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), at the 26th Annual HSTW Staff Development Conference in New Orleans, on Wednesday, July 11, 2012.

Student operating a medical machineSpence praised the Center for its achievement, pointing out that it takes dedication and hard work on the part of technology center leaders and teachers to make progress in preparing students for college and careers in an increasingly competitive world. He presented the award before an audience of more than 5,000 educators from across the nation attending the HSTW Conference.

To earn this recognition, J. Harley Bonds Career Center had to increase their mean scores on the HSTW Assessment reading, mathematics and science tests by at least ten points from 2010 to 2012.

“We are very proud of our students’ achievements.  They were randomly selected from all the students so we feel that this assessment is an accurate measure of progress among all our students.  It is always amazing what students accomplish when they are challenged!” said J. Harley Bonds Center Director Wayne Rhodes.

TCTW was established in 2007 to assist shared-time career/technology centers to improve student achievement and produce graduates who can achieve in high-demand, high-skill, high-wage career fields. The TCTW design is based on the HSTW design, with modifications that address the specific needs of shared-time centers. More than 175 centers in 17 states participate in activities to promote increased academic performance.


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