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   Summit Drive Elementary • 424 Summit Dr. • Greenville, SC 29609 • (864) 355-8800 Wednesday, September 06, 2006

 
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School Portfolio

Summit Drive Elementary School

“Where Every Student is a Star!”

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                              

                             The Summit Drive Elementary School

UPDATED 2009

Megan Mitchell-Hoefer, Principal
Kristen Hill, Administrative Assistant

 

Greenville County Schools

Dr. Phinnize Fisher, Superintendent

2008-2013


 

COVER PAGE FOR SCHOOL PLANS

SCHOOL INFORMATION AND REQUIRED SIGNATURES

Summit Drive Elementary_______________________SCHOOL

 

Greenville____________________________________________SCHOOL  DISTRICT

SCHOOL RENEWAL PLAN FOR YEARS __2008-2013__________________

SCHOOL RENEWAL ANNUAL UPDATE FOR __2009-2010_____________

 

Assurances

The school renewal plan, or annual update of the school renewal plan, includes elements required by the Early Childhood Development and Academic Assistance Act of 1993 (Act 135) and the Education Accountability Act of 1998 (EAA) (S.C. Code Ann. §§ 59-18-1300 and 59-139-10 et seq. (Supp. 2004)). The signatures of the chairperson of the board of trustees, the superintendent, the principal, and the chairperson of the school improvement council are affirmation of active participation of key stakeholders and alignment with Act 135 and EAA requirements.

 

CHAIRPERSON, BOARD OF TRUSTEES

 

Megan Hickerson

 

 

 

PRINTED NAME

SIGNATURE

DATE

 

SUPERINTENDENT

 

Dr. Phinnize Fisher

 

 

 

PRINTED NAME

SIGNATURE

DATE

 

CHAIRPERSON, SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT COUNCIL

 

Mary Miller

 

 

 

PRINTED NAME

SIGNATURE

DATE

 

PRINCIPAL

 

Megan D. Mitchell-Hoefer

 

 

 

PRINTED NAME

SIGNATURE

DATE

ADDRESS:    424 Summit Drive                                                                                                                  Greenville, SC  29609                  

                                                                 

TELEPHONE: (864)  355-8800                                                                                            

 

E-MAIL ADDRESS:       mmitchel@greenville.k12.sc.us                                                   

 

STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT FOR SCHOOL PLANS

 

List the name of persons who were involved in the development of the school renewal plan.  A participant for each numbered category is required.

 

            POSITION                                                                 NAME

 

1.   PRINCIPAL                                                               Megan D. Mitchell-Hoefer

 

2.   TEACHER                                                                 Rebecca Johnson       ­­­­­­­

 

3.   PARENT/GUARDIAN                                             Holly Bolling

 

4.   COMMUNITY MEMBER                                      Rev. Blue Bryan

 

5.   SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT COUNCIL                Mary Miller

 

6.   OTHERS* (May include school board members, administrators, School Improvement Council members, students, PTO members, agency representatives, university partners, etc.)

 

      POSITION                                                                                   NAME

 

            Administrative Assistant                                                Kristen Hill

 

            Instructional Coach                                                       Pell Culler

 

            Special Education                                                         Lesley Pollard

 

            PTA President                                                              Jennifer Jerina

 

            Teacher of the Year                                                      Rhonda Willis

           

*REMINDER: If state or federal grant applications require representation by other stakeholder groups, it is appropriate to include additional stakeholders to meet those requirements and to ensure that the plans are aligned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSURANCES FOR SCHOOL PLANS (Mandated Component)

Act 135 Assurances

Assurances, checked and signed by the district superintendent and the principal, attest that the school/district complies with all applicable Act 135 requirements.

X_____  Academic Assistance, PreK–3 The school/district makes special efforts to assist children in PreK–3 who demonstrate a need for extra or alternative instructional attention (e.g., after-school homework help centers, individual tutoring, and group remediation). Provide a good example of academic assistance services for PreK–3 by referencing a page number of the plan along with the number of the Math goal, strategy 7-9, or activity 7-9.

 

X_____  Academic Assistance, Grades 4–12 The school/district makes special efforts to assist children in grades 4–12 who demonstrate a need for extra or alternative instructional attention (e.g., after-school homework help centers, individual tutoring, and group remediation). Provide a good example of academic assistance services for grades 4–12 by referencing a page number of the plan along with the number of the Math goal, strategy 5, or activity 5; ELA strategy 3 and 10.

 

X_____  Parent Involvement The school/district encourages and assists parents in becoming more involved in their children’s education. Some examples of parent involvement initiatives include making special efforts to meet with parents at times more convenient for them, designating space in schools for parents to access educational resource materials, including parent involvement expectations as part of the principal’s and superintendent’s evaluations, and providing parents with information pertaining to expectations held for them by the school system, such as ensuring attendance and punctuality of their children. Provide a good example of parent involvement by referencing a page number of the plan along with the number of the School Climate goal, strategy 8, 11 or activity 8, 11.

 

X____    Staff Development The school/district provides staff development training for teachers and administrators in the teaching techniques and strategies needed to implement the school/district plan for the improvement of student academic performance. The staff development program reflects requirements of Act 135, the EAA, and the National Staff Development Council’s revised Standards for Staff Development. Provide a good example of staff development by referencing a page number of the plan along with the number of the Math goal, strategy 2, or activity 2; Reading 15, 17.

 

X_____  Technology The school/district integrates technology into professional development, curriculum development, and classroom instruction to improve teaching and learning. Provide a good example of the use of technology by referencing a page number of the plan along with the number of the goal 6, 7 pg. 60.

 

X_____  Innovation  The school/district uses innovation funds for innovative activities to improve student learning and accelerate the performance of all students. Provide a good example of the use of innovation funds by referencing a page 60.

 

X_____  Recruitment  The school/district makes special efforts to recruit and give priority in parenting and family literacy activities to parents of at-risk 0–5 year olds. The recruitment program is not grade specific, but normally would be most appropriate for parents of children at the primary and elementary school levels and below, and for secondary school students who are parents.

 

X_____  Collaboration The school/district (regardless of the grades served) collaborates with health and human services agencies (e.g., county health departments, social services departments, mental health departments, First Steps, and the family court system).

 

X_____  Developmental Screening The school/district ensures that the young child receives all services necessary for growth and development. Instruments are used to assess physical, social, emotional, linguistic, and cognitive developmental levels. This program normally is appropriate at primary and elementary schools, although screening efforts could take place at any location.

 

X_____  Half-Day Child Development The school/district provides full-day child development programs for four-year-olds (some districts fund full-day programs). The programs usually function at primary and elementary schools, although they may be housed at locations with other grade levels or completely separate from schools.

 

X_____  Best Practices in Grades K–3 The school/district provides in grades K–3 curricular and instructional approaches that are known to be effective in the K–3 setting.

X_____  Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum for PreK–3 The school/district ensures that the scope and sequence of the curriculum for PreK–3 are appropriate for the maturation levels of students. Instructional practices accommodate individual differences in maturation level and take into account the student's social and cultural context.

X_____  Parenting and Family Literacy The school/district provides parenting activities and opportunities for parents of at-risk 0–5 year olds to improve their educational level. This program is not grade specific, but generally is most appropriate for parents of children at the primary and elementary school levels and below, and for secondary school students who are parents. Some districts operate the program at various schools, an early childhood development center, or some other location, while other districts operate the program through home visits.

 

 

X_____  Coordination of Act 135 Initiatives with Other Federal, State, and District Programs  The school/district ensures as much program effectiveness as possible by developing a district-wide/school-wide coordinated effort among all programs and funding. Act 135 initiatives are coordinated with programs such as Head Start, First Steps, Title I, and programs for students with disabilities.

 

X_____  The School-to-Work Transition Act of 1994 (STW)  The school/district provides required STW programs for grades 6–12, and STW concepts are a part of the developmentally appropriate curriculum for K–12.

 

Dr. Phinnize Fisher________________  ___________________________          _____

Superintendent’s Printed Name                  Superintendent’s Signature                       Date

(for district and school plans)

 

Megan D. Mitchell-Hoefer________   ____________________________            _____

Principal’s Printed Name                           Principal’s Signature                                Date

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Cover Page and Signatures                                                   2

 

Stakeholder Involvement for School Plan                                       3

 

Assurances for School Plan                                                   4-6

 

Table of Contents                                                                            7

 

Introduction                                                                            8

 

Executive Summary:

Greenville County Schools Profile                                         9

School Profile                                                                         10-11

 

Information and Analysis                                                       12-20

 

Student Achievement                                                              22-35

 

Quality Planning/Action Plan                                                 36-48

 

Professional Development Plan                                             49-51

 

Leadership                                                                              52-53

 

Partnership                                                                                      54-56

 

Continuous Improvement                                                       57-62

 

Office of School Quality Rubric                                             63-106

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

 

Summit Drive Elementary School faculty and staff began to review information for the School Portfolio update September of 2008.  We completed the Leadership for Continuous Improvement.   A Look Inward:  Reflections on Our Journey at a faculty meeting and discussed the results as a follow up.  This activity was beneficial and forced everyone to look at how we approach curriculum, assessment and instruction. We also discussed our beliefs and practices in each area.   

 

The school committees in place are professional development, curriculum and instruction, technology, student services and the leadership team, which consists of the chairs of each committee.  The principal, administrative assistant, instructional coach and a lead teacher chair each committee along with teacher co-chairs.  The faculty and staff along with parent members of SIC and PTA assist in the review of the school portfolio and action plan yearly.  Everyone graciously contributes to the partnership and strategic planning process work at Summit Drive Elementary School.

 

Each group was given the task of reviewing the portfolio sections and updating content.  A lot of discussion centered on changes over the past five years, such as curriculum, programs, organizational changes, and improvements.  As each section was completed, groups reviewed the work and sometimes included additional comments and/or suggestions.  The committee structure was as follows:

 

Text Box: Student Services

 

 

 

 

Greenville County Schools

 DISTRICT PROFILE

 

Greenville County Schools (GCS) is widely recognized as a leader in public education. Serving over 67,903 students, GCS is the largest public school system in South Carolina. According to the latest publication from the National Center of Education Statistics, GCS is the 51st largest school district in the nation. The area served by GCS covers over 800 square miles and includes almost all of Greenville County and portions of Laurens and Spartanburg Counties. The District facilities include 6 child development centers, 49 elementary schools, 18 middle schools, 14 high schools, 4 career centers, and 7 special focus centers. Among the elementary, middle, and high schools, 12 International Baccalaureate programs and 11 magnet academics operate, providing unique educational opportunities, including concentrations in foreign language, communication arts, pre-engineering, and science and technology.

GCS has 16 schools receiving federal funding from Title I. Title I funds allow schools to provide opportunities for children to acquire the knowledge and skills contained in the challenging state content standards. The GCS Title I program provides enriched and accelerated educational programs. These programs include school-wide programs which provide additional staffing, professional development, and parent involvement programs to help parents participate in the education of their children at home and at school.

GCS serves a culturally diverse population of students. The ethnic make-up of students in GCS in 2008-2009 was 59.9% white, 26.0% African-American, 10.4% Hispanic, 2.6% Asian, and 0.2% Native American. Dedicated to meeting the educational needs of all students, GCS serves over 10,790 (15.9%) students with disabilities. Of those, over 8,434 are students with disabilities more severe than speech and an additional 2,360 are students with speech disabilities. Additionally, 8,771 (12.9%) GCS students participate in the District’s gifted and talented program. GCS also serves over 5,800 (8.5%) students who meet the state specifications for English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL).

GCS stresses the importance of daily attendance for all students and teachers. As reported in the 2007-2008 Annual Report Card, GCS had an average student attendance rate of 96.2% and a teacher attendance rate of 95.6%. The annual student dropout rate was 3.8%.

There are 4,864 teachers in the District; 60.1% hold Master’s degrees or higher, while 500 are National Board Certified. The average teacher salary is $44,197. Thirteen Greenville County schools have been named National Blue Ribbon Schools of Excellence. Over the last thirty years, 18 schools have been designated Palmetto’s Finest Schools, our state’s highest honor for schools. In May 2009, three GCS schools were identified as Red Carpet Schools for their efforts to provide the highest level of customer service to their parents and school community. In the past six years, over 40 schools have received the honor at least once. Twenty-nine schools are part of the PTA National Schools of Excellence, and 34 schools have been identified as Baldrige Model Schools. Finally, 88% of our graduates in 2009 went on to pursue higher education.

In 2008-2009, Greenville County Schools earned National Accreditation from the AdvancED Accreditation Commission, recognizing GCS as a high quality school district and granting full accreditation to the school district and all of its schools.

Executive Summary

Summit Drive School Profile

 

Summit Drive Elementary School is a neighborhood school located in the city of Greenville.  The school opened in 1953 and a new building was built behind the old one in 2001.  Over the past six years, Summit Drive’s enrollment has increased from approximately 300 to 390 and serves four year old kindergarten through grade five.  The community that Summit Drive serves is seventy-six years old.  Our school has had a long standing tradition of support from the neighborhood.

 

Mission, Vision and Beliefs

 

The mission of Summit Drive Elementary School is to encourage continuous learning and increase student achievement.  The vision of Summit Drive Elementary School is to encourage students to become life-long learners and responsible citizens.  The belief is that all students can learn and that “Every Student is a Star.”

 

Instructional and Organizational Priorities

 

  • Increase student achievement in English Language Arts, math, science and social studies skills.
  • Continue to enhance science curriculum through the science lab and extension programs. (i.e. butterfly garden, compost project, organic garden, recycling, etc.)
  • Improve communication with parents, outside agencies and organizations to yield more involvement and participation in the school.
  • Continue to use Quality Tools with students to collect data, establish goals and encourage student self-assessment for continuous improvement.
  • Use a formal writing program (Write from the Beginning) and apply for Exemplary Writing Award in 2009.
  • Continue to gain knowledge and practice of the authentic writing process throughout the school and community.
  • Increase knowledge and practice of Learning Focused instructional strategies. (Version 7)

 

Student Learning Needs and Desired Results

 

1.  Need:                      Increasing PASS and SC-Alt in math, English/Language Arts, social studies and science scores among student subgroups in grades 3 through 5. 

 

1a.Desired Result:         Measurable increased student achievement and Adequate Yearly Progress

 

2.  Need:                      Continuing use of data collection to help in decision-making and goal setting for student achievement. (MAP, PASS and Aimsweb benchmarking data)

 

2a.Desired Result:         Visual evidence of increasing student achievement through charts and graphs. (Quality Tools)

 

3.  Need:                      Increasing English fluency among ESOL students

 

3a.Desired Result:         Greater communication with teachers and peers

                                    Increase academic progress

 

 

Performance Goals

 

  • Improve student achievement in English Language Arts (reading and writing)
  • Improve student achievement in math
  • Improve student achievement in science
  • Improve student achievement in social studies
  • Increase involvement of parents and community

 

Significant Accomplishments/Results in past six years

 

  • AYP was met in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2009
  • Red Carpet recipient in 2004
  • Active science lab with extension programs
  • Recognition in local, district and state Reflections contest
  • Ten National Board Teachers
  • Recipient of various grants, (i.e Alliance for Quality Education, Donors Choice, Safe Kids, and recycling grants)
  • Recipient of Metropolitan Arts Council grant for Artist-in-residence
  • PTA sponsored Artist-in-Residence program for all students
  • Exemplary Writing visit in 2009 (awaiting final decision)
 
 
 
 
Information and Analysis

School Profile

 

The community that Summit Drive serves is seventy-six years old.  Our school has had a long standing tradition of support from the neighborhood.  Summit Drive opened in 1952.  The original Summit Drive was demolished in June 2000 to make room for the new facility.  The new facility opened in August.

 

The student population at Summit Drive is very diverse.  We have a total population of 385 students.  There are 49% Caucasian students, 25% African American students, 19% Hispanic students, and 1% Asian.  Free and reduced lunch is provided to 55% of the students at Summit Drive. 

 

Student attendance is maintained at 96.61%.  Our special education population is 8.05%; and ESOL is 16.36%.

 

Summit Drive Elementary School faculty and staff consists of twenty-two classroom teachers.  These include:  one 4K teacher and assistant, three kindergarten teachers and assistants, four first grade teachers, three second grade teachers, three third grade teachers, and three fourth and fifth grade teachers.  Our special education department consists of three special education teachers, one speech, psychologist, part time occupational therapist and three special education teacher assistants.  We have a part-time guidance counselor, media specialist, instructional coach, part time Challenge, part-time ESOL teacher, one science lab teachers and a science lab manager, and our related arts department; one physical education teachers, one art and one music teacher. We also offer an after-school program with one director and 3 staff members.  We have one secretary, attendance clerk, nurse, four lunch room staff, four custodians, administrative assistant and principal.

 

We currently have ten National Board Certified teachers.

 

 

 

Analysis of School Personnel Data

 

                        Exper.   Gender   Educ.  Ethnicity

West

17

F

BS

C

Eggl

3

F

MS

C

Blevins

5

F

MS

C

Robertson

7

F

BS

C

Hueble

14

F

MS

C

Bennett

16

F

MS+30

C

Pool

12

F

MS+30

C

Caldwell

24

F

MS+30

C

Mason

31

F

BS +18

C

Bash

13

F

BS/NB

As.A

Cooper

7

F

BA

C

Willis

24

F

MS

C

Graham

5

F

MS

C

Rice

16

M

MS

C

Burkholder

21

F

MS

C

Johnson

34

F

MS +30/NB

C

Brown

2

F

MS

C

Minard

16

M

MS

C

McDermott

38

F

MS+30

C

Russell

14

F

MS+30

C

Shea

15

M

BS

C

Phillips

28

M

MS

C

Pollard

13

F

MS+30

C

Alexander

6

F

MS/EDS

C

Culler

15

F

MS/NB

C

Aucoin

18

F

MS

C

Donald

18

F

MS+30

C

Orr

2

F

BS+18

C

Hill

7

F

MS+30

C

Mitchell-Hoefer

19

F

Doctorate

 

Code:  MS-Masters  NB-National Board  MS+30- Masters +30 hours  

Ph.D.- Doctorate       BS- Bachelor of Science    EDS- Education Specialist

 

Analysis of Student Population Data

 

Ethnicity:

African American                      94

AA/American Indian                 1

Hispanic                                   75

White                                       187

White/Asian                              2

White/Af. American                  16

White/Am. Indian                     2

Other                                       3

 

Free/Lunch:                            48.04%

 

LEP/ELL:                               66 students/17.23%

 

 

Instructional and Organizational Effectiveness

 

School Processes

 

The processes at Summit Drive support our belief that teachers, students, parents, and community must all work together to educate our students.  There are many processes and programs at Summit Drive that strive to meet our student’s needs. 

 

The A-Team Process

Students who continue to experience difficulties after receiving extra help may be referred to the Academic Assistance Team (A-Team), a group of teachers, with the student’s parent who develop an individual plan for each student.   After completion of the A-Team process, students are screened for a possible referral for psycho-educational evaluation.  Depending on the testing results, the student may receive services form the special education department.

 

Community Involvement

School, PTA, and community programs support learning in math, language arts, science, and character education.  Some of the programs are:  Artist in Residence, Chapter Book Challenge, Chick-Fil-A breakfasts, holiday meals, Parent Workshops with the Instructional Coach, Fall Festival, Spanish Parent Meetings hosted by our guidance department, Kiwanis Terrific Kid Program, Clemson Architecture students, Teacher Cadets, student teachers from Bob Jones and Converse, Campus Beautification Day, Book Fair, fifth grade day, and grade level student-led conferences.

 

School Improvement Council

The School Improvement Council is composed of representatives from parents, teachers, and other community persons.  The council meets monthly to discuss school and community concerns, to make recommendations to the principal, and to prepare the annual school improvement report. 

 

Volunteer Tutors

Parent and community volunteers work with students on reading and math skills weekly.  Particular volunteers work with ESOL students to help them learn basic reading and English skills. 

 

Reading Benchmarks

Teachers administer the Rigby Benchmark assessment tool to all students two times during the school year.  This enables the teachers to diagnose any reading difficulties, assess reading fluency, and adjust instructional strategies. 

 

Writing Assessments

All students complete a writing sample three times per year.  The topic is determined by the School District of Greenville County’s Language Arts Consultant.  Teachers score the writing samples using the South Carolina state rubric.  These assessments guide writing instruction throughout the year, and determine growth. 

 

Flexible Math Groups

In grades 2-5 students MAP scores are analyzed to form flexible math groups.  These groups meet one day a week.  The students are placed into groups based on their ability level on each math strand.  The groups may change as the teachers teach different strands.  The DesCartes is used to guide instruction.

 

Accelerated Reader Book Challenge

Students in 2-5 grades check out chapter books from the instructional coach.  These books must be in their lexile range.  Students read these books during self-selected reading and take them home to read with their parents.  Once they complete the book, they write a summary and receive a prize.  Once they read 5 chapter books, they are invited to a celebration.

 

Response to Intervention

We implemented RtI in 2008 to identify students in kindergarten that were in need of more intense small group instruction.  In 2009 we implemented Soar to Success in grade one.  Each of these grade levels use the Aimsweb online data program to input and receive information on how their students are performing.  In the 2010-2011 school year, we will solely devote a teacher as an interventionist to serve first, second, third and fifth grade students who are performing poorly in reading.

 

ESOL Tutoring Program

One of our parents has devoted countless hours towards finding other parents who will work with our ESOL students on a weekly basis in word recognition and reading.  This is the second year of the program and we have consistently maintained at least eight volunteers that come regularly.  Along with the parent volunteers, the Governor’s School of Arts and Humanities student club have worked with our ESOL students and providing them with opportunities to read and make crafts.

 

 

Student Lunch Bunch

Lunch Bunch is a behavioral incentive program designed to increase positive behavior in the school and classroom.  Once a month, two students are chosen by their classroom teacher for exhibiting positive behaviors linked to our school wide STAR behavior intervention program.  The selected students are able to eat lunch in a special room with school administration and the school counselor.  Along with the small reward they receive (a pencil or snack), the students especially enjoy getting a chance to sit with students from other classes and enjoy talking and getting to know their school administration on a personal level.   

 

Guidance Services

Students in grades 1-5 receive bi-weekly classroom guidance lessons focusing on character education and life skills. Kindergarten also receives weekly classroom guidance lessons with a focus on empathy training.  Small groups are held to serve students in all grades.  Group topics include: family transition, school success and study skills, and self concept.  These groups meet for six sessions.  These groups change as needed.  The counselor coordinates service projects to assist those in the community and state.  Each year the counselor helps to select and honor terrific kids every nine weeks. She also helps select the governor’s citizenship award.  The guidance schedule will change next year due to a decrease in our counselor’s allocation from 1.0 to .5 (part-time).

 

Extended Day Program

This program provides supervised childcare for the 180 day school year for children enrolled in Kindergarten through fifth grade at Summit Drive.  The program operates from 2:30-6 each school day.  Students have a structured daily schedule of homework, outdoor activities, creative playtime, and games.

 

Curriculum and Instructional Effectiveness

Teachers at Summit Drive rigorously teach the state and district standards.  Lesson plans denote the standards or essential question as well as assessments and authentic activities for early finishers.  The standards are also communicated to students and parents.  Special education teachers also teach state standards to the applicable grade level as well as goals and objectives from the Individual Education Plans of their students.  Strategies are being used in the classrooms to differentiate instruction.  State adopted textbooks are used in all five subject areas.  School processes are in place that focus on the achievement of all students.

 

Literacy/ Language Arts

 

Building Blocks: 5K

Teachers use the Building Blocks to deliver Language Arts Instruction.  In kindergarten classrooms, teachers provide a variety of reading and writing experiences from which all children can develop these 6 critical understandings, which are the “building blocks” of their success.

  • Children learn that reading provides both enjoyment and information, and they develop a desire to read and write.

 

  • Students also learn new concepts and add words and meaning to their speaking vocabularies.

 

  • Children learn print concepts, including how to read from left to right, how to read from top to bottom, etc.

 

  • Children develop phonemic awareness, including the concept of rhyme.

 

  • Students learn to read and write “interesting-to-them” words, such as Pizza Hut & cat.

 

·        Students learn letters and sounds – usually connected to the interesting words they have learned.

 

Four Blocks (1st – 3rd) or Big Blocks (4th -5th)

The Language Arts Curriculum in Greenville county is delivered through the basic instruction of Pat Cunningham’s 4 Blocks (1st – 3rd) or Big Blocks (4th – 5th) (words, writing, guided reading, self-selected reading).  All teachers have received grading in the delivery system through Greenville County School District.  Each block of instruction is 30 to 45 minutes daily.  Materials for instruction include the basal readers, novels related to social studies, and supplemental readers to differentiate instruction.

 

Special Education

The resource teacher uses the SRA reading program with students who attend resource.  The EMD teachers utilize the Edmark reading program and TouchMath.  All of the special education teachers pull different materials from the regular education curriculum for all subject areas.

 

Math Instruction

Greenville County Schools adopted McMillan-McGraw/Hill in Spring 2009. The math instruction is standard-based.  All teachers have been trained in Every Day Counts Math.  This 15 minutes of instruction provides the following:  builds concepts on variety of topics over time, class discussions, multiple representations of important concepts

analyzing and predicting patterns, problem solving/multiple paths to a solution.  In addition, teachers use manipulatives daily to model a mathematical concept and to assess children’s understanding. Teachers also document on checklist dates standards are taught by being introduced, reinforced and maintained. Assessments include performance tasks open ended questions, recorded observations, student interviews, journal entries, tests, quizzes, student presentations, student self-assessments.

 

 

Social Studies, Science and Health

Social studies, health and science are taught in unit format. Instruction and expectations include a high degree of rigor. Lessons actively engage and involve students in the learning process. All levels of the revised version of Bloom’s Taxonomy are used in questioning students. An on-going grade level timeline for social studies is visible in each fourth and fifth grade classroom which is added to and reviewed throughout the year.

Teachers and students use maps during instruction. Science and Social Studies should be integrated with other content areas such as language arts and math.  Lessons are based on state social studies standards. A variety of assessment tools are used in the evaluation process. District provided Science Kits to teach the standards. Teachers provide engaging inquiry experiences and follow-up discussions on the findings.

 

Technology

Teachers integrate technology through instruction as much as possible. Teachers work with the Media Specialist to complete research in the media center.  We now have 3 laptop carts for each of our hallways.  We also have promethean boards in each classroom.  As a refresh school two years, we are now able to integrate technology in more ways.   The Compass Odyssey software program will be added this year, which will establish learning instructional paths from MAP results for children in grades two through five.  All certified teachers have completed a technology requirement for certification renewal.  Each teacher must renew every five years.

 

Assessment

Teachers continue to use the conventional forms of assessment:  teacher observation, grading daily performance, homework assignments, unit pre tests, teacher prepared tests, and project grading.  The state scoring scale is used which includes numerical scores and letter grades:

 

A         93-100

B          85-92

C         77-84

D         70-76

U         Below 70

 

Teachers use a rubric for units of study, and some utilize student portfolios.  Rubrics serve as guides for students to work towards curriculum goals and to help students evaluate their progress.  MAP testing provides teachers with the actual performance levels of their students as well as skills and concepts needed for individual mastery.  ITBS is administered in the fall for second grade and in the spring for fourth grade.  Grades 3-5 take the state PASS test each spring.

 

Grade Level Meetings

The administration and instructional coach meet with individual grade levels two times a month.  During these meetings we discuss curriculum issues.  Information and training from the district is reviewed.  Teachers are kept abreast of the latest methods of delivering instruction.  Each teacher has a grade level notebook divided into sections that include subject area, assessments, and a curriculum calendar.  Data from all mandated assessments are analyzed and a plan of action is created to improve student achievement.

 

School Committees

The teachers are divided into 4 different committees.  The committees have representatives form different grade levels and subjects.  The committees include:  Student Services, Curriculum and Instruction, Technology, and School Climate.  There is also a leadership committee.  The committees meet at least one a month to discuss school issues, fundraisers, curriculum and instruction, staff activities, and student groups.  We also have a Faculty Council with a grade level representative.  Issues other than curriculum and instruction are addressed in this group.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student Achievement

 

 

Mission, Vision and Beliefs

 

The mission of Summit Drive Elementary School is to encourage continuous learning and increase student achievement.  The vision of Summit Drive Elementary School is to encourage students to become life-long learners and responsible citizens.  The belief is that all students can learn and that “Every Student is a Star.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

23.4

 

 

 

 

Met

26.0

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

50.6

 

 

 

 

 

3rd

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

24.0

 

 

 

 

Met

12.0

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

64.0

 

 

 

 

 

4th

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

31.4

 

 

 

 

Met

31.4

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

37.3

 

 

 

 

 

5th

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

15.1

 

 

 

 

Met

34.0

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

50.9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

21.1

 

 

 

 

Met

24.8

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

54.0

 

 

 

 

 

3rd

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

19.6

 

 

 

 

Met

15.7

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

64.7

 

 

 

 

 

4th

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

25.0

 

 

 

 

Met

26.9

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

48.1

 

 

 

 

 

5th

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

19.0

 

 

 

 

Met

31.0

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

50.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

19.3

 

 

 

 

Met

44.7

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

36.0

 

 

 

 

 

3rd

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

29.4

 

 

 

 

Met

23.5

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

47.1

 

 

 

 

 

4th

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

13.5

 

 

 

 

Met

55.8

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

30.8

 

 

 

 

 

5th

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

15.5

 

 

 

 

Met

53.4

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

31.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

25.2

 

 

 

 

Met

49.5

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

25.2

 

 

 

 

 

3rd

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

44.0

 

 

 

 

Met

40.0

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

16.0

 

 

 

 

 

4th

2009

 

 

 

Not Met

25.5

 

 

 

Met

49.0

 

 

 

Exemplary

25.5

 

 

 

 

5th

2009

 

 

 

Not Met

9.7

 

 

 

Met

58.1

 

 

 

Exemplary

32.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All

2009

 

 

 

Not Met

11.3

 

 

 

Met

50.0

 

 

 

Exemplary

38.7

 

 

 

 

3rd

2009

 

 

 

Not Met

11.5

 

 

 

Met

38.5

 

 

 

Exemplary

50.0

 

 

 

 

4th

2009

 

 

 

 

Not Met

9.6

 

 

 

 

Met

55.8

 

 

 

 

Exemplary

34.6

 

 

 

 

 

5th

2009

 

 

 

Not Met

14.3

 

 

 

Met

50.0

 

 

 

Exemplary

35.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Student Learning Needs and Desired Results:

 

Pass 2010 Data

 

            In the area of writing, 76.6% of students at Summit Drive scored “exemplary” or “met.” Writing was a strength for fifth grade students with 15.1% scoring “not met.” However, in fourth grade 31.4 % of students scored “not met” indicating a weakness in fourth grade compared to third through fifth grades. English language arts also showed as a weakness for fourth grade compared to third and fifth grade data. 25% of fourth graders scored not met in the area of ELA. Overall, Summit Drive had 78.8% of students score met or exemplary in ELA.

            In the area of math, 80.7% of students scored exemplary or met. The math data indicated math as a strength for both 4th and 5th grade with only 13 – 15% scoring not met. However, 3rd grade had 29.4% of students scoring not met indicating an area of weakness for 3rd grade. Science data also indicating an area of weakness for 3rd grade with 44% of 3rd graders tested scoring not met. However, 3rd grade tested a random sample only including half of the students in 3rd grade. School-wide Summit Drive scored 74.7% exemplary or met in science. The area of science was a particular strength for 5th grade with only 9.7 % scoring not met. However, all 5th graders were not included in this data as only half of 5th graders were tested in the area of science.

            School-wide, social studies data showed the highest percent of exemplary or met at Summit Drive. With 88.7% exemplary or met, social studies was a strength for all grade levels. 3rd and 5th grade students only tested a random sample as the entire 4th grade was tested in the area of social studies.

            It is our desired goal to increase our exemplary and met percentages by 4 to 5 percentage points each year.  By the year 2014-2015, at least 95% of our students should be at the met/exemplary level.

 

Survey Data:

                                                   

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Teachers…Satisfied with learning environment

86.2

100

100

100

 

100

 

100

 

100

Teachers…Satisfied with social and physical environment

96.6

100

100

100

 

963

 

100

 

100

Teachers…Satisfied with home-school relations

89.3

100

100

100

 

100

 

100

 

92.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students…Satisfied with learning environment

85.7

91.7

64.1

97.4

 

 

80.6

 

 

87.1

 

 

92.5

Students…Satisfied with social and physical environment

82.4

91.7

73.7

94.9

 

93.5

 

90.3

 

92.5

Students…Satisfied with home-school relations

91.4

94.4

74.4

94.7

 

90.3

 

93.5

 

90.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parents…Satisfied with learning environment

87.0

86.4

100

92.6

 

84.6

 

100

 

93.1

Parents…Satisfied with social and physical environment

65.2

100

88.9

85.2

 

69.2

 

100

 

100

Parents…Satisfied with home-school relations

78.3

71.4

94.4

85.2

 

69.2

 

91.7

 

82.1

*Note:  Data does not reflect the number of surveys received from participants.

 

            Since the beginning of the State School Report Card, fifth grade teachers, parents and students have been asked to complete an annual survey responding to three areas:  (a) learning environment; (b) physical environment; and (c) home-school relations.  Teachers have responded in high favor of each area each year giving 100 percent, except 2003.  In 2003, only 86.2 percent were satisfied with the learning environment, 96.6 percent were satisfied with social and physical environment and 89.3 percent were satisfied with home-school relations.  

            Students responded more positively in 2006 and 2004 than any other year.  The lowest year was 2005, where 64.1 were satisfied with the learning environment, 73.7 percent were satisfied with social and physical environment and 74.4 percent were satisfied with home-school relations.

            Parents have been satisfied in each area more in some years than others.  In the area of the learning environment, parents were satisfied in 2005 with 100 percent than in 2004 with only 86.4 percent.  In the area of social and physical environment, parents were more satisfied in 2004 with 100 percent than in 2003 with 65.2 percent.  In the area of home-school relations parents were more satisfied in 2005 with 94.4 percent than in 2004 with 71.4 percent.  Overall, home-school relations, has a dramatically improved since 2002.

            Parents in 2007 showed that only 84.6% were satisfied with the learning environment.  Unfortunately, their satisfaction with social and physical environment and home relations was lower than any year over the past five years.

            In 2008, teachers were pleased 100% in all areas and in 2009, only showed a slight decline in the area of home and school relations.  Students were more satisfied with home and school relations in 2008 than in 2009, yet the lowest area of satisfaction in 2008 was with the learning environment.  Student satisfaction in the other areas during 2008 and 2009 stayed about the same in the mid-nineties.  Lastly, 100% of parents were satisfied in 2008 with the learning environment and the social and physical environment.  The lowest area of satisfaction was in 2009 with home and school relations.  All other areas were between 100% and 93.1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

ACTION PLAN

2008-2013

 

GOAL AREA:

 FORMCHECKBOX Student Achievement       FORMCHECKBOX Teacher/Admin Quality    FORMCHECKBOX School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools, etc.)   FORMCHECKBOX Other Priority

 

PERFORMANCE GOAL 1:  The percentage of students in grades 3-5 who meet or exceed on the PASS test in math will increase from 80.7% in 09-10 to 84% in 2010-2011.

 

OBJECTIVE           1:  The percentage of students in grades 3-5 who meet or exceed on the PASS test will increase 4% each year.

 

Baseline Average

   2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

80.7

 

84

 

88

 

92

STRATEGY

Activity

 

Timeline

Person Responsible

Estimated Cost

Funding Sources

(act 135, academic assistance, categorical funding, Title II, etc.)

Indicators of Implementation

Monitor

(Date)

Finished

Continued

Modified

Disaggregate math test data for each student group using MAP and PASS results

2010-11

Instructional Coach, Administration

0

NA

Assessments, spreadsheets

C

Ensure all new staff is trained in Calendar Math.

2010-11

Instructional Coach

District

0

NA

In-service Sheet from Summer Academy

C

Implement Every Day Math Counts Program consistently and systemically

2010-11

All Teachers

0

NA

Lesson plans, Observations

C

K-2 teachers administer benchmark tests to assess math level of students and differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all students.

2010-11

K-2 teachers, Instructional Coach

0

NA

Results and planning

C

Hold MAP DesCartes refresher training and planning

2010-11

Instructional Coach

2-5 teachers

0

NA

Grade Level Minutes

C

Use Compass Odyssey Computer Program with students in grades 1-5 a minimum of 45 minutes a week. (The Compass lab will be a daily duty post in the mornings)

2010-11

Grades 1-5 Teachers

0

NA

Student Records, Observation

C

Teachers in grades 2-5 will conduct flexible math groups according to student’s performance level in each strand.

2010-11

Teachers, Related Arts teachers, Instructional Coach, Administration

0

NA

Plans, observation

C

Teachers will have a short assessment each flexible group meeting to monitor learning.

2010-11

All teachers

0

NA

Assessment results

C

Daily PASS practice in grades 3-5

2010-11

Teachers

0

NA

Observation, plans

C

Conduct Fall, Spring and Winter MAP testing.

2010-11

Instructional Coach

0

NA

MAP Testing schedule

C

 


 

ACTION PLAN

2008-2013

 

GOAL AREA:

 FORMCHECKBOX Student Achievement      FORMCHECKBOX Teacher/Admin Quality     FORMCHECKBOX School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools, etc.)    FORMCHECKBOX Other Priority

 

PERFORMANCE GOAL 1:  The percentage of students in grades 3-5 who meet or exceed on the PASS test in ELA will increase from 78.8% in 09-10 to 82% in 2010-2011.

 

OBJECTIVE 1: The percentage of students in grades 3-5 who meet or exceed on the PASS test will increase 4% each year.

Baseline Average

   2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

78.8

 

82

 

86

 

90

 

STRATEGY

Activity

 

Timeline

Person Responsible

Estimated

Cost

Funding Sources

(Act 135, academic assistance, categorical funding, Title II, etc.)

Indicators of Implementation

Monitor

(Date)

Finished

Continued

Modified

Provide RTI instruction to support students having difficulty in reading

(gr. K-2)

2010-11

5K, Interventionist

0

NA

Intervention

Schedule

C

Aimsweb data to assess student reading growth in (K-2)

2010-11

5K and 1st grade students, Interventionist

0

NA

Aimsweb Data

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use STAR reading program to assess student reading growth in grade 1.

2010-11

1st grade teachers

0

NA

STAR Reports

C

Continue to implement 4 blocks, Building Blocks and Big Blocks in grades K-5.

2010-11

Instructional Coach, Teachers

0

NA

Lesson plans & observations

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue to support TESOL students daily.  (English in a Flash)

2010-11

ESOL teacher and parent volunteers

0

NA

Observations, daily lessons, sign in volunteers

C

Continue to use quality tools to promote continuous progress.

2010-11

All teachers

0

NA

Observations and graphing

C

Analyze ELA MAP and PASS scores

2010-11

Instructional Coach, 3-5 grade teachers, Administration, Interventionist

0

NA

Results Reports

C

Teachers will receive a refresher on Learning Focused  strategies

2010-11

Teachers, Paula Burgess, Instructional Coach, Administration

0

NA

Observation/ Plans

C

Accelerated reading program has merged with the Race to Read program, which requires students to read at home and complete an AR test.

2010-11

Instructional Coach

All Teachers, Media Specialist

$300

Library Funds

Reading Logs, Teacher Records

C

Differentiate instruction using coaching groups during guided reading in grades 3 and 5.

2010-11

3rd, 5th  grade teachers

All teachers differentiate using leveled readers

0

                 NA

Observation/ Plans

C

Teachers will assess reading using the Rigby benchmark

2010-11

All Teachers

0

NA

Results

C

 

 

 

 

 

ACTION PLAN

2008-2013

 

GOAL AREA:

 FORMCHECKBOX Student Achievement      FORMCHECKBOX Teacher/Admin Quality   FORMCHECKBOX School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools, etc.)    FORMCHECKBOX Other Priority

 

PERFORMANCE GOAL 1:  The percentage of students in grades 3-5 who meet or exceed on the PASS test in writing will increase from 76.6% in 09-10 to 81% in 2010-2011.

 

OBJECTIVE           1:  The percentage of students in grades 3-5 who meet or exceed on the PASS test will increase 5% each year.

Baseline Average

   2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

76.6

 

81

 

86

 

91

 

STRATEGY

Activity

 

Timeline

Person Responsible

Estimated Cost

Funding Sources

(act 135, academic assistance, categorical funding, Title II, etc.)

Indicators of Implementation

Monitor

(Date)

Finished

Continued

Modified

Refine 6+1 traits during daily writing and utilize Writer’s Handbook strategies

2010-11

All teachers, Instructional Coach

0

NA

Lesson plans, observations

C

Continue school-wide letter writing program

2010-11

Entire school staff, parents and community

0

NA

Star Mail system

C

Teachers will use district writing benchmarks to assess student’s writing.

2010-11

All Teachers

0

NA

Results

C

Continue to use Thinking Maps, which allows teachers to integrate writing across the curriculum, as well as teaching students 8 organizational plans for informational text.

2010-11

All teachers, IC

0

NA

Observations

C

Utilize writing lessons on common drive during writing

2010-11

All teachers

0

NA

Observations, lesson plans

C

Participate in ongoing writing refresher trainings throughout the year (UpState Writing Project)

2010-11

Instructional Coach and Upstate Writing staff

0

NA

Professional development sign-in sheets

C

 


 

ACTION PLAN

2008-2013

 

GOAL AREA: School Climate

 FORMCHECKBOX Student Achievement   FORMCHECKBOX Teacher/Admin Quality       FORMCHECKBOX School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools, etc.)    FORMCHECKBOX Other Priority

 

PERFORMANCE GOAL 1: Provide consistent communication in multiple forms for the staff, parents, and students of Summit Drive.                       

Baseline Average

(2009-10)

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

The School Report Card Survey data will be reviewed and a school survey distributed at the end of each school year.   *See pg. 45 for historical data from surveys

 

 

 

 

*Represents projected improvement

 

STRATEGY/Activity

Timeline

Person Responsible

Estimated Cost

Funding

Sources

 

Indicators of Implementation

Monitor

(Date)

Finished

Continued

Modified

Update school and teacher handbook yearly.

2010-11

Administration

$200

Local

Updated copy

C

Use easel boards and the marquee to advertise all major school events.

2010-11

Custodial Staff

Administration

0

NA

Viewing of Messages

C

Post weekly notes of school events on board and in weekly School Reminders to faculty and staff.

2010-11

Administration

0

NA

Copies of notes

C

Post a monthly school calendar on board at staff mailboxes, on the school webpage, and in the school newsletter.

2010-11

Media Specialist

Administration

0

NA

Copies of Calendars and webpage

C

Utilize a template and a weekly schedule for student-led morning announcements.

2010-11

Attendance Clerk

Grades 1-5

0

NA

Copy of Schedule and Guidelines, Conversation with students or teachers

C

Maintain communication with local media sources.

2010-11

Administrative .Assistant, PTA

0

NA

News articles

C

Increase parental involvement by extending invitations to school events through School Messenger.

2010-11

Administrative Assistant

0

NA

Invitations, surveys and Quality Tools

C

Increase collaboration with Northside United Methodist Church and Northgate Church on school projects.

2010-11

Administration

Teachers

0

NA

Record of activities

Sign-in system

C

Develop a process for obtaining parent volunteers for the classroom.

2010-11

PTA

0

NA

Volunteer Sign-in

 

C

 

Plan meetings for our ESOL parents and have a translator available.

2010-11

Administrative Assistant, ESOL teacher

0

NA

Conference minutes

C

Continue to implement Safe and Healthy School Program through website information, Walk to School Days, Safety Patrol Program, Buddy’s Safety House and student created articles on school webpage.

2010-11

PE Teacher

Teachers

Media Specialist

0

NA

Webpage, participation in activities, student articles

C

Post School Messenger messages on school website.

2010-11

Admnistration, Media Specialist

0

NA

Webpage, Email

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

Survey Data:

                                                   

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Teachers…Satisfied with learning environment

86.2

100

100

100

 

100

 

100

 

100

Teachers…Satisfied with social and physical environment

96.6

100

100

100

 

963

 

100

 

100

Teachers…Satisfied with home-school relations

89.3

100

100

100

 

100

 

100

 

92.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students…Satisfied with learning environment

85.7

91.7

64.1

97.4

 

 

80.6

 

 

87.1

 

 

92.5

Students…Satisfied with social and physical environment

82.4

91.7

73.7

94.9

 

93.5

 

90.3

 

92.5

Students…Satisfied with home-school relations

91.4

94.4

74.4

94.7

 

90.3

 

93.5

 

90.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parents…Satisfied with learning environment

87.0

86.4

100

92.6

 

84.6

 

100

 

93.1

Parents…Satisfied with social and physical environment

65.2

100

88.9

85.2

 

69.2

 

100

 

100

Parents…Satisfied with home-school relations

78.3

71.4

94.4

85.2

 

69.2

 

91.7

 

82.1

*Note:  Data does not reflect the number of surveys received from participants.


 

ACTION PLAN

2008-2013

 

GOAL AREA: School Climate

 FORMCHECKBOX Student Achievement   FORMCHECKBOX Teacher/Admin Quality       FORMCHECKBOX School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools, etc.)    FORMCHECKBOX Other Priority

 

PERFORMANCE GOAL 1: All certified teachers will have completed the PAS-T evaluation at least three times by 2014.                

Baseline Average

(2009-10)

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

6 Teachers

Cycle 3

 

6 Teachers

Cycle 2

 

6 Teachers

Cycle 1

 

6 Teachers

Cycle 3

 

6 Teachers

Cycle 2

*Represents projected improvement

 

STRATEGY/Activity

Timeline

Person Responsible

Estimated Cost

Funding

Sources

 

Indicators of Implementation

Monitor

(Date)

Finished

Continued

Modified

Teachers will participate in an in-service on PAS-T evaluation requirements each year and receive necessary materials and timelines.

2010-11

Administration

0

NA

Agenda

C

Each teacher on formal evaluation will receive a Fall and Spring observation.

2010-11

Administration

0

NA

ePAS

C

All teachers will establish an academic achievement goal based on student data each year.

2010-11

Teachers

0

NA

Goal-setting form

C

Teachers will conduct two peer observations each school year.

2010-11

Teachers

0

NA

Observation Write up Form

C

Teachers will work with the IC and Administration to establish SMART goals

2010-11

Teachers, Administration, IC

0

NA

Goal Setting Form

C

All 8 Performance Standards will be represented in the teachers PAS-T notebook.

2010-11

Teachers

0

NA

Pas-T notebook

C

 

 


 

Professional Development Plan

 

Teachers and staff at Summit Drive attend numerous research-based in-service workshops, conferences, university classes, and training sessions.  In the 2002-2009 school years, school-wide staff development included the following topics:  PAS-T, TESOL, Quality Tools: Continuous Quality Improvement, rubrics, Vertical Team Planning, Best-Practices, 4-Blocks/Building Blocks/Big Blocks, Differentiated Instruction, Success Maker, Promethean Board and Activotes, webpage development, flexible coaching groups, Writing Exemplary Practices, Odyssey Compass software training and Learning Focus Teaching Strategies.

Individual teachers attended workshops on MAP, Des Cartes, PACT training, web page development, and Response to Intervention.

Teachers and/or administrators attended conferences in the following curricula areas:  math, reading, Everyday Counts, writing across the curriculum, Science Summer Plus Institute, Quality Tools for Learning, Peace Center Outreach, MAP, Writing Exemplary, Compass Odyssey, Response to Intervention Leadership Training, Emergency Response Training and Learning Focus Teaching Strategies.

Various staff members have attended professional development programs in music, science, health, reading, math, special education, technology, writing, social studies, office training, early childhood, CPR, and National Board Certification.

Summit Drive Professional Development Plan is based on our school goals, as stated in our Action Plan, which is data-driven and aligned with the District Education Plan and the No Child Left Behind Act. Our professional development plan focuses on research-based programs, models, and best practices in education. The following table shows the professional development focus for each year. Staff development initiatives over the past four years continue to be on-going and revisited for refresher trainings.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2005-2006

2006-2007

2008-2009

2009-2010

MAP

Focused Learning

Writing/Thinking Maps and Write from the Beginning

Exemplary Writing/6+1 Traits of Writing

Differentiating Instruction

Success Maker

Response To Intervention for 5K students

Response to Intervention for 1st grade students

Data Analysis

 

Compass Odyssey

Compass Odyssey

Success Maker

 

Webpage

Promethean Boards (update)

Writing Rubrics

 

Promethean Boards (updates)

Health and Wellness

 

District Programs include Pat Cunningham’s 4-Blocks, Everyday Counts Math, Rigby Benchmarks, Writing Rubrics, Measure of Academic Progress (MAP), Intel Learning Focus Teaching Strategies and Building Blocks. Each year new teachers must receive staff development on these topics from the district and/ or the Instructional Coach.

In 2003-2004, Summit Drive became a Quality Tools School. The staff unanimously adopted the model. Along with in-house training, teachers attend monthly training sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce/ Carolina First Center of Excellence in Schools. Teachers have practiced using Quality Tools for continuous improvement with their students to solve problems and improve processes.

When Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) was introduced in Greenville County in 2005, the district’s staff development focus shifted to using data to guide instruction. As we have learned to differentiate instruction, teachers are using DES CARTES as a tool to teach skills that were identified as weak according to the MAP data. This data is also compared to PACT data that becomes available in the fall.  Success Maker is a computer program that was purchased by our school in spring 2006. Teachers were trained in fall 2006 and have utilized the software to differentiate instruction for reading and math. The program creates individualized activities that help the student progress in the areas of reading and math.

In addition to the professional development that is mandatory for Summit Drive, teachers and staff have many opportunities to attend numerous in-service workshops, conferences, and summer in-service workshops. In the summer of 2006, Greenville County’s Summer Academy began offering many free workshops on various subjects for teachers to earn points and continues each summer.

Individual teachers also attended workshops during the school year on MAP, Des Cartes, PACT training, web page development, PAS-T and ADEPT evaluator classes, and SCRA. Various staff members have attended professional development programs in music, science, health, reading, math, special education, technology, writing, social studies, office training, early childhood, CPR, and National Board Certification. Teachers and/or administrators attended conferences in the following curricula areas:  math, reading, Everyday Counts, Writing Across the Curriculum, Science Summer Plus Institute, Quality Tools for Learning, Peace Center Outreach, and MAP. As a result of teacher training in curriculum development Summit Drive was selected in the fall of 2005 as a silver award winner due to student achievement performance on the PACT.

In the future we will continue to utilize the following data to determine necessary staff development to meet the needs of our students:  MAP, PASS, Rigby Benchmarks, Writing Assessments, Compass Odyssey, RTI/Aimsweb and teacher survey results.  Faculty and staff will also participate and continue to implement district initiatives such as Focused Learning, Curriculum Connections and Exemplary Writing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leadership

 

            Mrs. Megan D. Mitchell-Hoefer has served as principal of Summit Drive for five years.  Prior to this assignment, Mrs. Mitchell-Hoefer was principal at Hollis Academy of Year-Round Education for five years and assistant principal for two years.  Mrs. Mitchell-Hoefer has taught grades three, four, five and also adult education.  She has had the opportunity to teach in three states:  Virginia, New York and South Carolina.  Presently, Mrs. Mitchell-Hoefer is working toward completion of her doctoral degree.

            Ms. Kristen Hill joins the administration staff at Summit Drive as its’ second official administrative assistant.  Prior to this assignment she taught three years in North Carolina and three years at Grove Elementary School.  She has taught grades 2 and 3.  She holds a Masters Degree in Elementary Administration and Supervision.

            Administrative responsibilities range in the areas of curriculum and instruction, school and community relations, human resources, communication, interaction with students and educational leadership.  Both administrators share in discipline issues, parent conferences and support staff departments.  Delegated duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

  • Discipline
  • Staff Evaluations
  • IEP, A-team meetings
  • RTI/Aimsweb Leadership Team Chair
  • Scheduling
  • Safety and Transportation Issues
  • Textbooks
  • Student recognition incentives

 

            The decision-making structure regarding personnel, safety and some financial decisions begins with the administration; however, most school-wide decisions are discussed and reviewed by teacher committees.  Ultimately, a representative from each grade level/department and administration reviews committee reports.  This is the Leadership Team whereas most final decisions are made.

Text Box: Leadership Team

 

 

 

 


 

            Progress towards meeting school-wide goals (eg student achievement, school goals, etc.) are discussed with the School Improvement Council and PTA.  These two groups are able to discuss and provide valuable input about the school, which is relayed back to the faculty by the administration.

            The financial management process and governance of the school is primarily handled by the building principal.  Teachers become involved in the financial allocation of money when reviewing the school action plan.  Teachers also have an opportunity to share how money is spent for their classrooms and grade level before the closing of school when all the funds are spent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Partnerships

 

For over 36 years, Summit Drive has had 100% membership in the PTA.  The PTA has consistently sponsored many school-wide events such as Back to School Night, Open House, meals for staff, Fall Festival, and Beautification Day. In addition, they sponsored monthly grade level performances and transition nights at the end of each year. Every other spring a community/school yard sale is held at the school.   Spring will feature additional grade level performances. All profits from PTA events benefit the students.

In addition, PTA and SIC have undertaken several school projects. They have worked together to provide instructional materials, Science Lab enhancement, Artist in Residence, field trip support for students, landscaping for campus beautification and an upper grade level playground.  A “Memory Lane” was established highlighting memorabilia from past students and staff permanently displayed within the school.

The PTA and staff members continually work together to seek additional funding for school projects.  Grants and funding have been received from the South Carolina Arts Commission for an Artist in Residence; Carolina First Center for Excellence for Quality Tools staff development and the Greenville Chapter of the American Institute of Architects for fifth grade studies (Clemson University).

Summit Drive traditionally received support from the surrounding community. In addition to parents and grandparents, volunteer hours exceed 1,000.  Other involvement includes: tutors from various colleges, Fall Festival volunteers from Bob Jones University, Wade Hampton and Greenville High School, arts demonstration students from the Governor’s School for the Arts, and architectural students from Clemson University. Several volunteers donate their time on a weekly basis to help ELL/ ESOL students. Furman students and business representatives have worked with classes through the Junior Achievement Program.

Volunteers/Partnerships

PTA volunteer hours exceed 1,000                               Parent lunches with students

ELL/ ESOL volunteers                                     City Police and Firefighters

Kiwanis Terrific Kid Program                           Student teachers and practicum                                                                                                 students from area colleges

Bob Jones University students                           Governor’s School for the Arts

Clemson Architecture students

Greenville Symphony                                                    Northgate Baptist Church 

Northside United Methodist Church provides a School Supply Drive each year for our students and allows several of our students to utilize their lawn to play after school.   We also team up with Northside to have a Blood Drive in the fall.

 Junior Achievement                                                      Girl Scouts                  

Greenville Safe Kids

PTA Sponsored Activities

Summit Drive has had 100% membership for over 36 yrs          Back to School Night/Dinner

Meals for teachers and staff                                          Open House meeting and dinner

Fall Festival                                                                  Chick-fil-a Friday Breakfast

Beautification Day                                                         Frodo’s

Bingo Night                                                                  Movie Nights

PTA and SIC projects

Provided instructional materials                        

Book Drive

Monthly sponsored grade level performances

Science Lab enhancement

Upper Grade Playground

Artist in Residence

Field trip support for students

Volunteers for Field Day

Landscaping for Beautification Day

Box Tops and Campbell Soup label education program

Grants from the South Carolina Arts Commission for an Artist in Residence each year

School-wide Programs

Quality Tools staff development sponsored by Carolina First and the Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Greenville Chapter of the American Institute of Architects for fifth grade studies. (Clemson University)

Grant writing:  The Science Lab teacher received two grants this year, which will begin a composting project.  One of our PTA parents is writing a grant that will enable us to grow our own organic garden.

The recycling program is a major component of the Science Lab and future garden.

School-wide Giving Opportunities

Salvation Army “Kans for Kids” yearly campaign

Pennies for Patients

Winner in the Festival of Trees sponsored by Saint Francis Hospital System

American Heart Association (Jump Rope for Heart)

Angel Tree for school families  

Christmas performance for Pendleton Manor Nursing Home

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuous Improvement and Evaluation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality Assurance and Performance Report

 

 

How does the school ensure that the plan for improvement is enacted, monitored and analyzed on a continuous basis?

 

The faculty and staff review the school’s mission, vision and beliefs at the beginning of each school year.  We also conduct the Continuous Improvement Continuum exercise to gauge where we are in the seven core areas of continuous improvement.  The action plan is reviewed and changes are made as needed.  In the past, we have only reviewed the plan once a year; however, from preparing for this peer review it was mentioned that we need to review the plan a minimum of three times a year.  It was suggested at the beginning of the year, again in the winter and then in the spring.  All were in agreement of this routine.

 

How does the school use and communicate the results of its efforts to improve student learning?

 

We communicate student achievement results a number of ways.  First, the faculty and staff meet to discuss PACT results.  Once the report cards are issued, we review, once again the characteristics of the report card, such as “Schools Like Us,” attendance rates, AYP results of subgroups and the overall rating and improvement rating.  From this point, teachers begin to look at their personal goal-setting for the year.  Surprisingly, most of the teachers choose to focus on the same content area in alignment with the school test results.

 

Results are also communicated via parent meetings on the School Report Card and AYP.  We use this as an opportunity to educate our parents on how to read the report card and test data.  Later in the year, we have a curriculum night and share various ways we are approaching teaching and learning.  Parents have an opportunity to learn more about science, math, English Language Arts, social studies and technology curriculum, as well as testing programs, such as MAP, Accelerated Reader and Success Maker.

 

Lastly, in the fall, schools issue a Report to the Community, which is a brief description of how a school is doing in areas of testing, volunteerism, programs and much more. 

 

This report is shared not only with parents, but the community as a whole.

How does the school manage its internal systems (e.g. organizational planning, scheduling, evaluation systems, and allocation of resources to ensure that they effectively serve and enhance student learning?

 

The school schedule does not change dramatically from year to year.  More discussion takes place about morning and afternoon bus duties.  Teachers are reminded the amount of time to allocate per subject and must post their schedules outside of their classrooms.

 

The organizational structure has been in place for quite a while where teachers are on a particular committee.  This year we added a Leadership Team, but have not used this team often.  Most of our committee/team focus this year has been preparing for our peer review.   Most often, the work and planning occurs through either assigned committees or during grade level meetings every other week.

 

The financial budgets and accounts are managed by the school principal, however, supplemental funds are shared with teachers and grade levels are given a particular amount to spend on instructional materials.  In the spring, we review the action plan and discuss ways to spend additional funds.

 

In the future, to ensure quality assurance is occurring, the action plan must be reviewed more often the mission and vision of the school should be visible at all times.  Also, the leadership team should function in the role it was intended, which is to explore school-wide issues and solutions.  These are three areas that have not been reinforced throughout the school year, but will be enforced in the future.


 

Continuous Improvement Continuums

 

Information and Analysis

 

Approach:                    (4)  There is a systematic reliance on hard data (including data for subgroups) as a basis for decision making at the classroom level as well as at the school level.  Changes are based on the study of data to meet the needs of students and teachers.

 

Implementation:            (4)  Data are used to improve the effectiveness of teaching strategies on all student learning.  Students’ historical performances are graphed and utilized for diagnostics.  Student evaluations and performances are analyzed by teachers in all classrooms.

 

Outcome:                     (3)  Information collected about student and parent needs, assessment, and instructional practices are shared with the school staff and used to plan for change.  Information helps staff understand pressing issues, analyze information for “root causes,” track results for improvement.

 

Student Achievement

 

Approach:                    (4)  Data on student achievement are used throughout the school to pursue the improvement of student learning.  Teachers collaborate to implement appropriate instruction and assessment strategies for meeting student learning standards articulated across grade levels.  All teachers believe that all students can learn.

 

Implementation:            (4)  There is a systematic focus on the improvement of student learning school wide.  Effective instruction and assessment strategies are implemented in each classroom.  Teachers support one another with peer coaching and/or action research focused on implementing strategies that lead to increased achievement.

 

Outcome:                     (3)  There is an increase in communication between students and teachers regarding student learning.  Teachers learn about effective instructional strategies that will meet the needs of their students.  They make some gains.

 

Quality Planning

 

Approach:                    (3)  A comprehensive school plan to achieve the vision is developed.  Plan includes evaluation and continuous improvement.

 

Implementation:            (3)  Implementation goals, responsibilities, due dates, and timelines are spelled out.  Support structures for implementing the plan are set in place.

 

Outcome:                     (3)  There is evidence that the school plan is being implemented in some areas of the school.  Improvements are neither systematic nor integrated school wide.

 

Professional Development

 

Approach:                    (4)  Professional development and data-gathering methods are used by all teachers and are directed toward the goals of continuous improvement.  Teachers have ongoing conversations about student achievement research.  Other staff members receive training in their roles.

 

Implementation:            (4)  Teachers, in teams, continuously set and implement student achievement goals.  Leadership considers these goals and ensures appropriateness of professional development.  Teachers utilize effective support approaches as they implement new instruction and assessment strategies.

 

Outcome:                     (4)  A collegial school is evident.  Effective classroom strategies are practiced, articulated school wide , and are reflective of professional development aimed at ensuring student achievement.

 

Leadership

 

Approach:                    (4)  Leadership team represents a true shared decision making structure.  Study teams are reconstructed for the implementation of a comprehensive continuous improvement plan.

 

Implementation:            (4)  Decisions about budget and implementation of the vision are made within teams by the principal by the leadership team and by the full staff as appropriate.  All decisions are communicated to the leadership team and to the full staff.

 

Outcome:                     (4)  There is evidence that the leadership team listens to all levels of the organization.  Implementation of the continuous improvement plan is linked to student learning standards and the guiding principles of the school.  Teachers are empowered.

 

Partnership Development

 

Approach:                    (3)  School has knowledge of why partnerships are important and seeks to include businesses and parents in a strategic fashion related to student learning standards for increased student achievement.

 

Implementation:            (3)  Involvement of business, community, and parents begins to take place in some classrooms and after school hours related to the vision.  Partners begin to realize how they can support each other in achieving school goals.  School staff understand what partners need out of the partnership.

 

*Note:  Involvement of parents and the community are evident; however, business partnership has not been formed officially or formally.  This is an area in need of improving.

 

Outcome:                     (2)  Much effort is given to establishing partnerships.  Some spotty trends emerge, such as receiving donated equipment.

 

Continuous Improvement and Evaluation

 

Approach:                    (4)  All elements of the school’s operations are evaluated for improvement and to ensure congruence of the elements with respect to the continuum of learning students experience.

 

Implementation:            (3)  Elements of the school organization are improved on the basis of comprehensive analyses of root causes of problems, client perceptions, and operational effectiveness of processes.

 

Outcome:                     (3)  Evidence of effective improvement strategies is observable.  Positive changes are made and maintained due to comprehensive analyses and evaluation.

 


 

OFFICE OF SCHOOL QUALITY

 

 

STAFF DEVELOPMENT SELF-ASSESSMENT RUBRIC

 

 

 

 

OUR GOAL IS TO SUPPORT CHANGE IN BOTH EDUCATOR PRACTICE AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT BY FOSTERING A LEARNING COMMUNITY.

 

 

 

 

STAFF DEVELOPMENT IS A PROCESS NOT AN EVENT; THE EVALUATION OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT SHOULD MEASURE A CONTINUUM OF IMPROVEMENT JUST AS CHANGE SHOULD BE AN IMPROVEMENT PROCESS.

 


 

The staff development self-assessment rubric is based on the National Staff Development Council’s revised twelve Standards for Staff Development.[1]  The rubric represents best practices in staff development at the school level and is intended to be used by schools to improve the daily work of administrators and teachers to increase student learning. The principal/leadership team should use the rubric to denote what practices are currently being implemented in the building as well as to identify areas where improvements are needed. There are no right or wrong answers. The Planning and Support Section asks only that you provide an honest assessment that reflects current practices in your school.

Each of the twelve standards is presented with indicators and accompanying practices defined in four stages: no evidence, early, intermediate, and advanced.

What you should do

1.              Place a check in the boxes that identify the practices currently implemented in the school.

2.              Submit a copy of the completed self-assessment rubric to the Office of School Quality.

How to use the rubric

1.              Once you have established current practices, determine the practice(s) that need to be strengthened or initiated.

2.              Implement the practice(s) in the school to support the school renewal plan and increase student learning.

 


 

1.   Learning Communities

Staff development that improves the learning of all students organizes adults into learning communities whose goals are aligned with those of the school and district.

1.1 Administrators and teachers support collegial interaction for the purpose of improving their daily work to improve the learning of all students. 

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX The faculty meets as a whole on a regular basis focusing primarily on district/school updates.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The school schedule does not provide opportunities for teachers to participate in learning teams.

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers are assigned to learning teams (i.e., grade level, subject matter, interdisciplinary, vertical), but the time is used for individual planning or non-instructional tasks.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Opportunities are provided for teachers to participate in learning teams, but expectations and accountability measures are not established.

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers meet on a regular basis for planning instruction, conducting parent conferences, and handling managerial duties.

 

The principal works with the faculty to

x FORMCHECKBOX create learning      teams/instructional      teams

 FORMCHECKBOX   schedule time during the school day for collegial      interaction

Teachers meet regularly with learning teams during a scheduled time during the day to

x FORMCHECKBOX      examine standards students    are required to master

x FORMCHECKBOX   develop more effective      lesson plans

 FORMCHECKBOX   critique student work

x FORMCHECKBOX   monitor student progress

 FORMCHECKBOX   assess the effectiveness of instruction

 FORMCHECKBOX   identify needs for staff      development

The principal

 FORMCHECKBOX   provides time during the      school day for collegial      interaction

 FORMCHECKBOX   provides opportunities for teachers to serve in leadership           roles

 FORMCHECKBOX   ensures teachers have the skills, knowledge, and support needed   to successfully participate in      earning teams and leadership           roles.

 FORMCHECKBOX   establishes processes and          outcomes for learning teams

 FORMCHECKBOX   monitors learning teams to ensure time is used well


 

2. Leadership

Staff development that improves the learning of all students requires skillful school and district leaders who guide continuous instructional improvement.      

2.1 The school renewal plan is a key strategy for supporting significant improvements.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX The school renewal plan does not specify staff development.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX A school renewal plan is in place, but the staff development activities are not based on data-driven needs identified in the needs assessment.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX A data-driven school renewal plan is in place, but a review to determine the effectiveness of the impact of staff development is not occurring on a regular basis.

 FORMCHECKBOX A data-driven school renewal plan based on needs assessment is in place and a review of the effectiveness of implementation of activities learned through staff development occurs on a regular basis.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The school renewal plan serves as a guide in the selection of staff development activities for continuous instructional improvement through the monitoring of the implementation indicators.

 

2.2 Leadership responsibilities are distributed among teachers and other employees.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX There is no instructional leadership team.

 FORMCHECKBOX An instructional leadership team has been established (e.g., content/grade level leaders, mentors, master teachers, instructional coaches), but does not meet on a predictable basis.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX All staff development decision-making is principal-driven.

 FORMCHECKBOX An instructional leadership team is established and meets regularly.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX There is no active leadership development and/ or sharing occurring within and among the leadership team members and the principal.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The instructional leadership team is not actively involved in the development and implementation of staff development identified in the school renewal plan.

 FORMCHECKBOX An instructional leadership team has been established and meets on a regular basis.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The team is actively involved in activities that build leadership capacity within the group and throughout the school and that provide opportunities to share leadership with the principal.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The instructional leadership team is actively involved in the development, implementation, and monitoring of the impact of staff development on classroom practice.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Instructional team leaders make certain that their colleagues have the necessary knowledge and skills and other forms of support that ensure success.


 

2.3 Principals support school-based staff development.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX The principal is not actively involved in the staff development process (e.g., planning, implementation, monitoring).

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The principal does not provide systematic opportunities for faculty/staff to acquire necessary skills/knowledge and does not state expected results. 

 FORMCHECKBOX The principal provides time and money, but is not actively involved in the staff development process. 

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The principal establishes expected student learning outcomes.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX No expected classroom practices are established in relation to staff development.

x FORMCHECKBOX The principal provides resources (time and money) and is an active participant in the staff development process.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX The principal establishes expected student learning outcomes that support school improvement goals.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX The principal establishes expected classroom practices that result from staff development.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Monitoring the implementation of new strategies is not done.

The principal is an active participant in planning, facilitating, delivering, and evaluating staff development on a continuous basis by 

x FORMCHECKBOX establishing expected      student outcomes

x FORMCHECKBOX establishing expected      classroom practices

x FORMCHECKBOX monitoring the      implementation of new      strategies

x FORMCHECKBOX allowing time to practice   strategies and receive    feedback on the      implementation of new skills

2.4 Policies and organizational structures are established to support ongoing professional learning and continuous improvement.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX The calendars/schedules are in place but they do not support the staff development initiatives.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Effective two-way communication concerning staff development is not evident.  Existing communication is top-down.

 FORMCHECKBOX  There is an attempt to modify calendars and schedules to support staff development initiatives. 

 

 FORMCHECKBOX  Two-way communication regarding the faculty’s attendance and perceptions of staff development is occurring.

 FORMCHECKBOX Principal works with faculty to create a schedule that allows time within the calendar and school day to support school-based staff development.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX  Two-way communication regarding the implementation of new practices is occurring.

 FORMCHECKBOX Principal and faculty develop calendars, daily schedules, and incentive systems that support school-based, embedded staff development. 

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Principals/leaders establish effective two-way communication regarding the implementation of new practices, their impact on student learning, and needed adjustments to curriculum, instruction, and assessment.


 

2.5 Leaders support the use of various electronic tools to enhance learning and make work more efficient.

 

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX There is no evidence that technologies are used to support staff development.

 FORMCHECKBOX There is evidence that technology is being used to support staff development.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Computers are available for faculty use and training in the use of technology is provided.

 FORMCHECKBOX There is some evidence that teachers are using technology to enhance the implementation of staff development.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers have demonstrated the technology competencies identified by the district.

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use technology on a regular basis to enhance classroom instruction.

 

Teachers use technology to

x FORMCHECKBOX   communicate

x FORMCHECKBOX develop lesson plans

x FORMCHECKBOX deliver instruction

x FORMCHECKBOX enrich

x FORMCHECKBOX remediate

x FORMCHECKBOX   assess

x FORMCHECKBOX   analyze student work

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Principals and teachers have the knowledge and skills necessary to utilize school-based computerized programs.


 

2.6 The principal is an effective instructional leader who models and supports continuous improvement.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX Principal does not participate in professional learning experiences related to instructional leadership.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Members of the school staff view their leaders as managers of school.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX There is no evidence that time is spent monitoring the implementation of best practices through classroom observations or monitoring of lesson plans.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Principal reads articles about instructional leadership and/or attends conferences.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Principal periodically reviews student performance data and grade distributions, but does not offer suggestions pertaining to altering curriculum, instruction, or assessment.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Principal infrequently conducts classroom observations and reviews lesson plans, but provides no feedback to teachers.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Principal attends short-term sessions on instructional leadership and plans to apply new knowledge and skills during the workday.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Principal discusses with the faculty current instructional approaches and, as necessary, adjustments in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Principal visits classrooms, reviews lesson plans, meets with teachers to review benchmarks/student data and provide feedback.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Principal takes part in the South Carolina Leadership Academy and applies the learning at the school level.  Completed

 

Principal supports the instructional program by

x FORMCHECKBOX allocating time for      collaboration

x FORMCHECKBOX developing learning teams

 

Principal provides opportunities for teachers to

 FORMCHECKBOX    analyze student work

 FORMCHECKBOX   align curriculum and      standards

 FORMCHECKBOX    develop joint lesson plans

 FORMCHECKBOX   develop assessments/rubrics

 FORMCHECKBOX    become mentors, master     teachers, or coaches

 FORMCHECKBOX    conduct peer visits

 


 

3. Resources

Staff development that improves the learning of all students requires resources to support adult learning and collaboration.

 

3.1 School and district leaders coordinate resources (time and money) to facilitate job-embedded professional development.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX There is no consistent plan for funding.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX There is no time scheduled during the day for grade level/content area teachers to collaborate on instructional practices.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX There is no coordination between external staff development and school initiatives based on needs assessments.

 FORMCHECKBOX Funding is allocated for specific programs and does not align with the school’s identified needs.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Schedules allow for individual teacher planning time.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The staff development aligns with the school’s plan, but tends to be event-driven and not job-embedded.

x FORMCHECKBOX Resources are aligned and coordinated to support school-based initiatives.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Daily schedule allows common planning time for instructional teams to meet.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Staff development supports the school’s initiatives and occurs as part of the daily schedule.

The school demonstrates

1) continuity of services

 FORMCHECKBOX  between programs

 FORMCHECKBOX  between grade levels/content     area(s)

2) coordination of resources

 FORMCHECKBOX  funding sources

 FORMCHECKBOX  time

 FORMCHECKBOX  materials & supplies

 FORMCHECKBOX  internal & external facilitators

3) ongoing evaluation

 FORMCHECKBOX  observations

 FORMCHECKBOX  lesson plans

 FORMCHECKBOX  student work

 FORMCHECKBOX  assessments

4) job-embedded staff development

 FORMCHECKBOX  common planning time

 FORMCHECKBOX  collaboration

 FORMCHECKBOX  peer visits

 FORMCHECKBOX  reflection time

 FORMCHECKBOX  coaches & mentors

 FORMCHECKBOX  opportunities for feedback &        follow-up


 

4. Data-Driven

Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses disaggregated student data to determine adult learning priorities, monitor progress, and help sustain continuous improvement.

4.1 Administrators and teachers analyze data to determine student needs to prioritize staff development and adjust instruction.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX School goals are not based on the collection and analyses of data.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Data are not used to design and evaluate staff development activities.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Classroom data are not used to measure the impact of staff development on student learning.

 FORMCHECKBOX The principal analyzes student performance data to develop school goals and informs the faculty of the results and needs.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Data in the form of surveys are collected to select the  “wants” of staff development and to evaluate participants’ attendance and reaction to staff development activities. 

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers analyze student performance data at the end of the year to monitor improvements.

 

The principal and selected faculty analyze disaggregated student performance data to determine

x FORMCHECKBOX  school improvement goals

x FORMCHECKBOX  student needs

x FORMCHECKBOX  teacher needs

 

The principal and selected faculty members design staff development and decide what 

x FORMCHECKBOX  is to be learned

x FORMCHECKBOX  are the expected classroom            practices that result from                    staff development activities

x FORMCHECKBOX  will be indicators of success (how it will be evaluated)

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers monitor student data twice a year (beginning and end) to assess impact of staff development and monitor improvement. 

 

 

Entire faculty and administration work together to review a variety of data:

1) student achievement results

       x FORMCHECKBOX  PACT (by subject/by grade),

        FORMCHECKBOX  benchmark tests,  FORMCHECKBOX ACT,  FORMCHECKBOX SAT,

        FORMCHECKBOX  HSAP,  FORMCHECKBOX EOCE,  FORMCHECKBOX AP,

        FORMCHECKBOX  student work,  FORMCHECKBOX other

2) context of school

       x FORMCHECKBOX  discipline, x FORMCHECKBOX attendance,

        FORMCHECKBOX  graduation rate,  FORMCHECKBOX dropout rate,

        FORMCHECKBOX  GPA,  FORMCHECKBOX gifted & talented,

        FORMCHECKBOX  retention,  FORMCHECKBOX other

3) programs/processes/practices

       x FORMCHECKBOX  review of current programs,

        FORMCHECKBOX  classroom practices,

        FORMCHECKBOX  instructional strategies

4) perceptions

       x FORMCHECKBOX  report card survey,

        FORMCHECKBOX  observations,  FORMCHECKBOX interviews

The faculty and administration track and analyze student data continuously to monitor

x FORMCHECKBOX   the impact of classroom practices       on student achievement

x FORMCHECKBOX   the current instructional program                 and make adjustments as                        needed

x FORMCHECKBOX   the impact and/or need for staff             development


 

5. Evaluation

Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses multiple sources of information to guide improvement and demonstrate its impact.

5.1 Administrators and teachers evaluate the impact of professional development initiatives on instructional practices and student learning.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX No evidence of evaluating staff development is present.

 FORMCHECKBOX Evaluation of staff development is limited to assessing attendance and personal satisfaction with the event.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX The principal evaluates the changes in teachers’ knowledge and skills as evidenced by observations, surveys, interviews, lesson plans.

An evaluation of staff development is used to

1) improve the quality of current staff development    through

 FORMCHECKBOX  surveys

 FORMCHECKBOX  interviews

 FORMCHECKBOX  focus groups

 FORMCHECKBOX  observations

2) assess the impact of staff development on    instructional practices and student learning through

 FORMCHECKBOX  analysis of classroom and school level student     data

x FORMCHECKBOX  observations/lesson plans

3) assess the effects of staff development on the

 FORMCHECKBOX  school culture

 FORMCHECKBOX  organizational structures

 FORMCHECKBOX  policies

 FORMCHECKBOX  processes

 

All school professionals are involved in designing the staff development evaluation and the evaluation process by

1) establishing expected outcomes for

 FORMCHECKBOX  student learning

 FORMCHECKBOX  instructional practices

2) identifying data sources

 FORMCHECKBOX  quantitative

 FORMCHECKBOX  qualitative

3) conducting data analysis/interpretation

 FORMCHECKBOX  making recommendations for improvement


 

 

6. Research-Based

Staff development that improves the learning of all students prepares educators to apply research to decision making.

6.1 Administrators and teachers use educational research when making instructional decisions.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX The principal does not use educational research when selecting staff development activities or making instructional decisions.

 FORMCHECKBOX The principal and/or a select group of faculty use professional journals, “hearsay,” or “hot topics” to support the selection of staff development or school initiatives.

x FORMCHECKBOX The principal and faculty review research to ensure a good match between students and expected outcomes before adopting new practices.

x FORMCHECKBOX The principal and faculty review research, make school visitations, determine organizational support needed, and establish expected classroom practices and student outcomes before adopting new innovations.

i.e Quality Tools Day @ Bell’s Crossing

 


 

7. Design

Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses learning strategies appropriate to the intended goal.

7.1 The focus of adult learning at the school is to make expected improvements in classroom practices and student learning.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX There is no clear link between activities and the expected improvement of classroom practices and student achievement.

 FORMCHECKBOX Faculty attend conferences, workshops, courses, etc., to gain information about new programs.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Faculty watch tapes or videotapes with little follow-up discussion or application.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Faculty read journal articles individually. 

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development is selected on surface validity with no alignment to school’s identified needs.

x FORMCHECKBOX School provides a variety of staff development (e.g., workshops, coaching, study groups) to assist in the implementation of new strategies and activities.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Publications on successful educational practices are shared among the faculty through study groups, networking, and faculty meetings.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development is based on survey data and/or school plan. 

 

Expected improvements in classroom practices and student learning are clearly established and supported through

 FORMCHECKBOX  study groups

 FORMCHECKBOX  learning teams for planning lessons

 FORMCHECKBOX  networking for problem solving and reflection

 FORMCHECKBOX  opportunities to see behavior modeled and     receive feedback or practice

 FORMCHECKBOX  a rubric developed by the principal and staff     to identify expected classroom practices

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Staff development activities are closely linked to expected improvements.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Staff development is varied, research based, and incorporates multiple learning strategies.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Initial information sessions such as conferences and workshops are followed by a variety of job-embedded activities.

 

Follow-up support for expected improvements extends over several years and includes

 FORMCHECKBOX  peer visits

 FORMCHECKBOX  instructional coaches/mentors

 FORMCHECKBOX  courses or multiple sessions on same topic

 FORMCHECKBOX  lesson sharing among teachers

 FORMCHECKBOX  building a lesson plan resource bank

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Staff development is closely linked to teacher needs and adjusted to fit participant responses.


 

 

8. Learning

Staff development that improves the learning of all students applies knowledge about human learning and change.

8.1 Varied opportunities are provided for practice and application.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development is not linked to teachers’ needs, knowledge, or

experience.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development does not address the issues of change at the school.

 

 

 FORMCHECKBOX  Staff development is the same for all teachers; there is no differentiation in learning activities (e.g., first year teachers, new teachers to the building, experienced teachers, returning teachers).

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development activities are unrelated to those expected to be used in the classroom (i.e., lecturing on the inquiry method).

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development is designed as “one shot” sessions on new programs, innovations, or methodologies, and often

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers are resistant to change or are hesitant to try anything innovative         for fear or anxiety over results.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Initiatives change frequently (“this too shall pass”).

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development is differentiated to provide special training for new teachers, but does not offer experiences in mentoring, coaching, or leadership (to address the needs of experienced teachers).

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development activities demonstrate the expected classroom practices, but there is little or no time provided for practice and feedback.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX School initiatives are supported with multiple staff development sessions on the same topic, but time is rarely provided for practice and feedback, listening to faculty concerns/reservations, resolving problems, or addressing concerns and feelings of the faculty.

The school provides staff development that supports the career experience and interest of teachers through

 FORMCHECKBOX  mentoring

 FORMCHECKBOX  leading learning teams

 FORMCHECKBOX  utilizing technology

 FORMCHECKBOX  coaching

 FORMCHECKBOX  curriculum writing

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Staff development activities mirror the instructional strategies that are expected in the classroom, and time is provided for practice and feedback of the new skill.

 

School initiatives are supported with multiple staff development sessions and opportunities to interact with the new skill through

x FORMCHECKBOX  reflection

x FORMCHECKBOX  discussion and dialogue

x FORMCHECKBOX  writing

x FORMCHECKBOX  demonstration

x FORMCHECKBOX  practice and feedback

x FORMCHECKBOX  group problem solving

i.e Quality Tool Faculty Meetings

 


 

9. Collaboration

Staff development that improves the learning of all students provides educators with the knowledge and skills to collaborate.

9.1 Teachers collaborate consistently and effectively.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers work independently with little collaboration or interaction.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers deliver instruction but do not take responsibility for student learning.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers do not have opportunities to learn how to work effectively with colleagues to share information or tools, conduct or receive peer visits, accept corrective criticism on instructional practices, handle conflicts, or manage time allocated for collaboration.

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers are assigned to a grade level or content area team, but do not have a scheduled common planning time to plan and reflect on practice.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers assume responsibility for their own students’ learning.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development is offered in the area of collaboration/team building, but opportunities are not available to practice new skills.

 

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers are assigned to a grade level or content area team with a common planning time to discuss grade level/content area issues, develop lesson plans, or meet with parents.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Grade level/content area teams take responsibility for the learning of all students.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Opportunities are available and time is allocated for teachers to collaborate, and expectations for the use of time have been established.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers respect and manage conflicts in instructional beliefs.

Teachers meet on a regular basis to improve their practice and the achievement of all students by

x FORMCHECKBOX  examining student standards

x FORMCHECKBOX  planning units/effective lessons

x FORMCHECKBOX  developing assessments

x FORMCHECKBOX  critiquing student work

 FORMCHECKBOX  observing one another in the     classroom

 FORMCHECKBOX  suggesting alternative                instructional practices

x FORMCHECKBOX  solving the common problems of     teaching

 FORMCHECKBOX  reading articles

x FORMCHECKBOX  reflecting on their work

x FORMCHECKBOX  sharing their learning on how to     improve student learning


 

10. Equity

Staff development that improves the learning of all students prepares educators to understand and appreciate all students, create safe, orderly, and supportive learning environments, and hold high expectations for their academic achievement.

10.1 The administrators and teachers analyze the impact of attitude, background, culture, and social class on the teaching process and establish high expectations for all students.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers assert that “all” children can learn, but their classroom practices exhibit no evidence of differentiated instruction.

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development activities are provided to enhance teacher skills and knowledge about teaching struggling students, but classroom practices do not reflect such skills and knowledge.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The school’s culture and teachers’ attitudes predominantly reflect teachers’ social class with little attention to students’ heritage or individual needs.

x FORMCHECKBOX Staff development activities are provided to develop an understanding of how the attitudes of teachers affect teaching practices and expectations of student learning, as well as the need for alignment between the learning environment (teacher attitudes, beliefs, and social class) and the background of students.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development opportunities are provided to develop an understanding of how parents, SES, race, and background impact student learning.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Individual teachers may reflect a high level of commitment to accommodate individual student needs, but there is no school-wide systematic attempt to address individual needs.

x FORMCHECKBOX The school is committed to the success of all students.

 

The principal routinely adjusts

x FORMCHECKBOX   daily schedules

x FORMCHECKBOX   curriculum

x FORMCHECKBOX use of staff

to support learning of struggling students.

 

The principal establishes expected changes in classroom practices and schedules and conducts

x FORMCHECKBOX   classroom observations

x FORMCHECKBOX   coaching and follow-up    discussions/staff development

to ensure changes occur.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use knowledge of their students to provide developmentally appropriate curriculum and instruction.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers adjust and vary instructional practices and assessments based on their knowledge of their students.

 

Teachers develop relationships with students that demonstrate respect and encourage achievement through

x FORMCHECKBOX  daily lessons

x FORMCHECKBOX  interaction with students and    caregivers


 

10.2  Administrators and teachers establish a learning environment that is emotionally and physically safe.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX Rules and codes of conduct are established but not enforced.

 FORMCHECKBOX Staff development is provided in classroom management, but there is no school-wide discipline program.

 FORMCHECKBOX Classroom rules are established and displayed.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers distribute the discipline code book and reinforce school rules.

x FORMCHECKBOX School-wide discipline policies and procedures are established.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Expectations and consequences are posted and communicated to parents.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Discipline policy is enforced and write-ups and referrals are handled consistently and fairly.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Discipline data are analyzed and adjustments to program processes are made as needed.

 

10.3 Administrators and teachers demonstrate respect and appreciation for students and families and for their cultural backgrounds.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX Classroom activities do not reflect students’ cultural backgrounds.

 FORMCHECKBOX Holidays related to the cultural backgrounds of students are discussed in the classroom.

x FORMCHECKBOX Administrators and teachers develop and implement curriculum that integrates information about the contributions of students’ cultural backgrounds.

 FORMCHECKBOX Administrators and teachers involve family and community members in developing classroom and school-wide activities that promote an appreciation of cultural diversity.


 

 

11. Quality Teaching

Staff development that improves the learning of all students deepens educators’ content knowledge, provides them with research-based instructional strategies to assist students in meeting rigorous academic standards, and prepares them to use various types of classroom assessments appropriately.

11.1 Teachers demonstrate a deep understanding of subject matter that helps students meet rigorous standards.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX There is no alignment between the curriculum and the standards.

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers rely solely on the textbook to teach content, disregarding alignment to the standards.

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use a variety of resources and multiple instructional strategies when teaching.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Content is presented in different ways to ensure understanding of the concept and to accommodate individual needs.

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers plan interdisciplinary units with colleagues that focus on major content area concepts.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX Curriculum mapping, vertical teaming, and/or horizontal planning occur to ensure the standards are taught and tested at the appropriate times and level of rigor.

11.2 Teachers use appropriate instructional strategies that help students meet rigorous standards.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use predominantly one instructional strategy to deliver instruction (e.g., lecture, worksheets,  note taking) with no student participation.

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use one to two instructional strategies to deliver instruction with some student participation.

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use multiple instructional strategies and engage students in activities, but the activities are not clearly aligned with grade level standards.

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use multiple instructional strategies and differentiate instruction based on individual student needs; students are actively engaged in learning; and the activities address the grade level standards.

11.3 Teachers use various classroom assessments to monitor student progress and adjust instruction to help students meet standards.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use traditional assessments that predominantly measure the knowledge/recall level (e.g., fill-in-the-blank, multiple choice, true/false).

 

 FORMCHECKBOX There is limited alignment between instruction and assessment (a lack of “test what you teach, teach what you test”).

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use both formal and informal performance assessments (e.g., written tests, discussions, observations) to determine mastery, but often times instruction is not adjusted based on assessment results.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX There is alignment between instruction and assessment, but assessments are not on grade level.

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use a variety of formative assessments to promote and measure student learning; assessment results are used to plan instruction for the class as a whole.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX There is an alignment between instruction, assessments, and standards.

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers use standards-based assessments (e.g., rubrics, benchmarks) to assess mastery, promote student learning, and adjust instruction to meet individual student needs.

 

 FORMCHECKBOX Teachers observe each other in the classroom, analyze student work, and review the standards to ensure alignment between “what is tested” and “what is taught.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

 

12. Family Involvement

Staff development that improves the learning of all students provides educators with knowledge and skills to involve families and other stakeholders appropriately.

12.1 Administrators and teachers develop partnerships with families and other community stakeholders.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX Parents and community stakeholders are not involved in school-based activities or planning.

 FORMCHECKBOX Parents and community stakeholders are members of the school improvement council or school committees (e.g., booster club, APT/PTA/PTO).

x FORMCHECKBOX The principal shares information with students and families about community activities that support student learning skills and talents.

 

x FORMCHECKBOX The principal establishes a school committee that focuses on family and community involvement.

 FORMCHECKBOX The principal establishes school-based programs with the support of the community, businesses, agencies, or volunteers (tutoring, mentoring, after-school programs, homework assistance, lunch buddies).

 

 FORMCHECKBOX The principal works with the community to develop partnerships that enhance students’ skills and talents (school to work).

12.2 Administrators and teachers implement strategies to increase family and caregiver involvement.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX No evidence of activities encouraging family involvement.

 FORMCHECKBOX Administrators and teachers encourage families to attend school functions, conferences, and school performances.

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers communicate with families about school programs and student progress (e.g., report cards, grading practices, school events, student work, homework).

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers offer suggestions about strategies that parents can use to support student learning at home (e.g., parenting workshops, reading/math night).

12.3 Administrators and teachers use technology to increase communication between school and home about student learning.

No Evidence

Early

Intermediate

Advanced

 FORMCHECKBOX No evidence of home/ school communication beyond report cards.

x FORMCHECKBOX Teachers communicate with parents by interim reports, report cards, or parent/teacher conferences.

x FORMCHECKBOX In addition to mandated communication, teachers contact parents on a regular basis by phone, notes, agendas, or e-mails.

x FORMCHECKBOX School has a Web site where parents can access the Web page of their child’s teacher to view lesson plans, school/classroom news, classroom assignments, homework, and special notices.

 

 

 

 


 

[1]National Staff Development Council.  Standards for Staff Development Revised.  Oxford, OH: National Staff Development Council, 2001.

 

 

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